Have you tried the NEW OLD health food? What, haven’t heard of it? It’s called Bone Broth, a rich broth made from any animal bones that have already been roasted in your meal preparation or bought from your butcher and roasted in your oven.

Roasted Chicken Leftovers

Start by removing the cooked meat, then rinse and crack the bones so they will release their goodness,  if they are still intact, place the bones back into a clean pot, add enough water to cover plus 3-4 inches above the bones and simmer over a medium heat source for 3-8 hours.

  • The gelatin found in bone broth is a hydrophobic colloid that attracts and holds liquids, including digestive juices, thereby supporting proper digestion.

  • Bone broth reduces joint pain and inflammation courtesy of Chondroitin Sulfates, Glucosamine, and other compounds extracted from the boiled down bone cartilage.

  • Bone broth can be made from any type of bones you like – chicken, beef, pork, or even fish – but seek bones from organically raised, pastured, or grass-fed animals.

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To enhance the flavor, I add 1 teaspoon of sea salt, one medium onion cut in half, and  1 large carrot, 2 celery ribs, cut into one inch pieces but the flavorings can be any vegetable of your choice.

I’m guessing, by now, you have noticed the NEW OLD health food is an old favorite that our grandmothers have been making for centuries. Yep, the Bone Broth that is the rage of the culinary world, is an enriched broth or stock that cooks from every generation have been making for centuries.

The grandmother that gave you chicken broth for a cold was doing the right thing for you, without knowing it or having a doctor’s education.

As with a lot of things, the old is new again.  If you think you do not have time to engage in the making of this wonderful healthy broth, use your slow cooker for the simmering stage.  You can even leave it over night and have a cup in the morning to start your day.

Less Meat in Your Diet Means More Money in Your Pocket

We all know that reducing meat consumption can help us lose weight and reduce the risk of

chronic health problems and diseases. But, having less meat in your diet, can save you money as well.

The astronomical cost of raising the meat we eat is passed on to you, the consumer, in supermarkets

and restaurants.  Beans, eggs, fruits, vegetables and grains are much less expensive and can save

you some serious dollars by pulling meat off the list.

add broccoli instead of meat

 

You’ll even spend less in restaurants when you choose from the ‘heart healthy” or vegetarian menus.

Many restaurants all across the country are joining the meatless bandwagon and offering more

meatless entrees. One restaurant even provides a multi-course meatless tasting menu every

Monday and the owner claims that it’s perked up his (usually) slow Monday clientele.

It’s true that some organic and gourmet fruits, vegetables and nuts are decidedly more expensive

than a good deal on a $1 cheeseburger at your favorite fast food restaurant, but for vegetarian staples

such as beans, lentils, eggs, dairy, rice and corn, there’s no doubt that you’ll save money on your grocery bill.

Some supermarkets offer staples such as beans and nuts in bulk, saving you money and letting you

purchase only what you need, so there’s less waste.   Another option for meatless meals is ‘meatless meat.’

Veggie burgers, chicken substitutes and other products are readily available in almost every supermarket

and most health food stores. They’re made from soy and seasoned so that many would swear they’re

eating real meat.

These veggie substitutes are cholesterol free and there’s no fat, so, there’s no waste.   The Eastern world

has known about the benefits of tofu (soy) for centuries and countries such as China and Japan use

it in many exotic dishes and stir fries.  It tastes good and is good for you.

Meat on your grocery list means more money at the supermarket. Going meatless at least once a

week not only saves money, but more than that, it will decrease cholesterol and saturated fat and

make you healthier.   Less meat in your diet will mean better health and more spendable money in

your budget.

Are you getting enough iron in your diet? Many people don’t get enough iron in their diet. It’s an important element because it carries oxygen throughout your body. It’s required for digestion and many functions on a cellular level. Without enough iron in your diet, you will feel fatigued and can get sick easier. Women and children are particularly susceptible to iron deficiency and supplementation is often recommended to help them prevent anemia.

Red meat and shellfish are both easy sources of iron. However, there are many vegetable options, too. The following are a few of the vegetable choices that are richest in iron:

Seeds

Squash and pumpkin seeds are among the highest in iron. One ounce contains 4mg of iron or 23 percent of your recommended daily value. An ounce of sesame seeds also contains 23 percent of your daily value, sunflower seeds have 11 percent and flax seeds have 9 percent of your daily value. As you can see, a handful of seeds can help you get the daily iron you need.

Nuts

Nuts including cashews, pine nuts, hazelnuts, peanuts, and almonds all have a good amount of iron. An ounce of cashews has 1.7 mg or 9 percent of your daily value. An ounce of pine nuts also contain 9 percent of your daily value. Hazelnuts, peanuts, almonds, and pistachios all have 7 percent plus Macadamia nuts have 6 percent of your recommended daily value of iron in your diet.

Beans

Lentils and white beans have a good amount of iron in them. A cup of cooked beans has 6.6mg or 37 percent of your daily iron in your diet value. Other beans that are high in iron include soybeans, kidney beans, chickpeas, Lima and navy beans, black beans, pinto beans and black eyed peas. For many, a diet of beans and rice is a staple because it also provides a complete protein.

iron in you diet

Whole Grains

Whole grains also have iron. Quinoa is the highest with 15 percent of your daily value in one cup. Oats, barley and rice also provide iron for your diet and fortified grains plus many cereals contain more. Read the ingredients on their box to choose one high in iron for your diet.

Finally, let’s not forget dark leafy greens like spinach, beet tops, collards and chard which have 36 percent of your daily iron needs, per cup. The next time you make a pot of vegetable soup, drop in 3 or 4 handfuls of the leafy greens to enrich the iron in your diet. The goal is to make sure that you get enough. If not, your doctor may recommend supplementation to keep your body supplied with the right amount of iron it needs to run properly.

To me, there is nothing better, than opening my front door and smelling the aroma of my dinner cooking in my slow cooker or crock pot.
When I had five children at home, it was the most used cooking utensil in the kitchen, and still is. Although I am a single person now, I still use my tried and true friend, the crock pot.

Over the years, I have found, these few tips improve my crock pot cooking joy.

cold weather and hot food
[1] Using the right size crock pot, for the job.  I have three different size crock pot cookers, because I never want to over fill the cooking insert.  It would only cause spillage or under cooked food.
[2] Planning ahead by doing the chopping of your vegetables the night before and storing them in the refrigerator is the secret to quickly getting the meal together before leaving for work.  DO NOT, store the vegetables in the crock pot insert.  Starting with a cold insert will only add to the cooking time. So store the chopped veggies in an air tight container overnight, then place them in the cooker in the morning.
[3] You should prepare your meat before hand, too.  Remember you are cooking with low heat, so you do not want to have you meat to be too thick, as it may not reach a safe cooking temperature.  A piece of meat no more than 2 inches thick, should work great.  Keeping your whole chicken or chicken parts to about 2-3 pounds works well, also.  Do a spice rub on your meat of choice, cover or wrap, then place it in the refrigerator with your vegetables.
[4] DO NOT lift the lid on your crock pot, until you are within the last 30-45 minutes of the cooking time.  It will only release the heat and interupt the cooking process.
You can check for doneness or add spices in the last 30 minutes of so but at any other time, you are doing more harm than good.
[5] If time permits, add more flavor to your meal by searing your beef.  Heat a heavy skillet to hot, add a tablespoon of oil, then place the meat in the hot skillet, listen for the sizzle.  Cook on both sides about 1-3 minutes each, depending on the thickness of your meat.  Then place the piece of meat into your crock pot cooker and add any juices from the skillet before placing the lid on the slow cooker and starting your cooking time.  You will get a richer broth and fuller flavor from the beef by doing this extra step.

Fall is coming, we can feel the coolness in the air and see the leaves beginning to turn in color. Today I am passing along one of my Mother’s favorite cool weather recipes for Fried Green Tomatoes. Growing up I was never a big fan of this recipe but as it was one of mother’s favorites, I taught myself to make it when she came to live with me.

While it calls for green tomatoes, I always thought they were too tart, even after frying, so I use tomatoes that are just on the verge of turning pink but are still firm to the touch.

Fried Green Tomatoes

Fried Green Tomatoes

For this recipe you will need:

About ¾ cup yellow cornmeal

About ½ cup all purpose white flour

Salt and black pepper

About 1 teaspoon sugar, optional

About ½ teaspoon crumbled dried Italian oregano or sweet marjoram

1 extra-large egg or 2 medium

¼ cup of milk

3 to 4 green tomatoes, sliced about 1/2-inch thick

Oil for frying (I use vegetable or olive oil)


In a shallow bowl, mix the flour and cornmeal with the seasonings; season generously with salt and pepper. Beat the egg and milk, in another small shallow bowl.

Pour oil in a large skillet to about 1/2-inch deep then heat over medium heat. While the oil is heating place paper towels on a baking sheet.

One at a time, dip the tomato slices into the egg, and then dredge them, on both sides in the flour/cornmeal mixture. I use a fork or my hands, which ever you like, to handle the tomato slices, taking them from egg to dry ingredients, to skillet. Carefully drop them into the hot oil until the pan is full. Saute them in one layer, you might need to make them in a few batches. Turn them in about 3 to 5 minutes, when they are golden brown on the underside. Saute for another 3 to 5 minutes until golden brown and remove them from the oil, [use tongs for this move], then to the pan with the paper towels to drain, while you cook the rest.

Fried green tomatoes can be eaten, alone, as an appetizer or with a garlic aioli or corn salsa. They are often served as a side dish with supper, or they can also be served on a bed of greens with goat cheese rounds on top, as part of a salad. How ever you like them remember to serve them hot.