Summer time is here, which means, it is time to bring out the grill and get busy grilling.

The easiest grill to use, by far, is the gas grill but if you are wanting more flavor in your food, choose a charcoal grill for your grilling needs.

Smokers are especially nice because you can also control the flavor by changing the type of wood or wood chips you use. They are good if you want to slow cook your meat.

If you want to cook something a little quicker, you may just want to stick with the charcoal grill.
summer time and grilling
Charcoal grills can offer you the best in grilling, whether it be a large juicy steak or a pot of beans.  The offer direct and indirect heat sources, which means, if your grill is large enough you can cook the whole meal at one time.

Two of my favorite easy grilling recipes are:

  • Mrs Dash Chicken

6 Boneless Chicken Thighs

1 Teaspoon Garlic, minced

2 Tablespoons of Mrs Dash, original

Using a large plastic bag, add all ingredients and shake until the chicken pieces are coated in the spices and garlic.  Place on a well greased medium hot grill, skin side down and cook for about 4 minutes, depending on the size of your thighs.  Turn over once, the meat will let you know when, by the way if releases from the grill.  Do not force it, if it sticks, let it be for another minute then try turning it again.

Cook on the second side for about 3 minutes, then remove.  Allow it to rest about 5 minutes before eating, so all the natural juices can soak back into the meat.  Always use tongs when turning your meat to keep the natural moisture inside your meat pieces.

  • Grilled Corn On The Cob

6 Fresh Corn on the Cob, washed and cleaned

6 Tablespoons of soft Butter, infused with fresh basil and cilantro. [Add about one teaspoon of each, chopped fine to the butter]

Cover each corn cob with 1 tablespoon of the infused butter, then wrap in foil.

When all 6 have been wrapped, lay them on the indirect heat side of the grill, then close the lid.  Depending on the size of your corn, it will take between 15 and 20 minutes for them to cook.  Turn them every 5 minutes to give all the corn a chance to bathe in the melted butter.

Unwrap and eat with your chicken for a delightful meal. Grilling with friends and family is always a great way to fellowship and grow that lovin feeling.

What’s for dinner?  Here are some menu helping tips for busy a Mom.

Dinner being the last meal of the day, becomes a time when families can get together and talk about their day. It is also a hectic meal time for most moms who are just getting off of work.  If you are a busy mom, here are some menu planning tips to help make the age old question What’s for Dinner?, easier to answer and even have fun.

Schedule your meals a week in advance.

What's For Dinner

This is one of the most important planning tips for “What’s For Dinner”? Knowing what you are going to eat throughout the week means less chance that you will stop off at the closest fast food joint for a convenient, but unhealthy meal. Decide on the last day of the previous week, what the menu will be for the following week. Create your shopping list from the list of your on hand ingredients, to avoid buying what you don’t need at the grocery store.

Look for bargains.

Clip, share or trade coupons.  Read advertising circulars to decide where the best grocery to shop is for your menu items. If one ingredient is a common denominator in many meals, consider buying in bulk to save money. Common staples like milk, eggs, bread and sugar can be bought in bulk as well. Some stores will have double or triple coupon days when you can save even more.

Search online.

Don’t get into a rut, your family will get tired of chicken and rice every Thursday.  Use the Internet to search for new and exciting What’s for Dinner? recipes.  You can also learn to put a new twist on an old recipe for a new taste.

Have a leftover night.

After cooking meals for five or six days, there is bound to be left over food.  Choose one night a week to be leftover night and let everyone mix and match for dinner. It will save you money and keep your food waste to almost nothing.

Cook your meals in advance.

After deciding on your, What’s For Dinner? menu question, go ahead and fix as many of the meals, as you can. Choose a day when you will have some help on hand.  Each person can take one meal and fix it for the following week. Once everything has cooled, store it in sealed containers or casserole dishes to be frozen until the night it is needed.

Do prep work in advance.

In most cases, all of the meals can’t be cooked at once time. Some foods just taste better, cooked fresh. For them, do as much prep work as you can, in advance.  Get your kids to help chop but let them use the kitchen shears instead of knives. When you have the vegetables chopped and the cooked meat, diced, place them into air tight container and refrigerate, until needed.  Mix together the dry ingredients and do likewise. The night of the meal, add the wet ingredients and cook.

What’s for dinner?, does not have to be a question that only mom can answer. The entire family can help with dinner so it is a relaxing meal for everyone.

Here is one of my favorite places to get family dinner ideas:

 

Home cooking can make a difference in your life and food budget.  These days, people are turning to their home stoves and cookware rather than dialing up for take-out or delivery, or heading to a restaurant.  People choose to eat at home because they think it’s healthier and better for the family, and finances are only part of that. Regardless, cooking at home can make all the difference. Here’s how.

Home Cooking

  • Known Ingredients

When you  do home cooking for your own meals, you know what is going into your recipes. Even if you don’t know the number of calories or the sodium content,  you do know you can control the sodium, sugar, and caloric content just by using the correct ingredients when you cook your own food. Restaurant food often has many different additives in it, not to mention high amounts of salt and sugar.

When you are at home cooking, you aren’t fooled by clever names or labels  that some restaurants place in their menus, to get you to think they are thinking of your health.

  • Less Time Than You Think

Lots of people are fear the prospect of cooking at home because  most think it takes to much time to cook and clean up. But think about this, by the time you get everyone dressed and out the door, 30 minutes have gone by.  Traveling will take another 15-30 minutes.  Finding a seat and ordering, will add another 20 minutes, then the wait for it to be cooked and brought to your table will add 20 minutes to an hour.   You will have spent  anywhere from 90 minutes to 2 hours, getting ready and waiting to eat.

Most home cooked meals take from 30 to 45 minutes to prepare,  then you eat and maybe you will have a 30 minute clean up period but you can share that with the rest of the family, so it will go quicker.  Home cooking and cleaning up can be family time, too.  Time, learning how your kids day went, how your spouse cleaned their desk to get home to the family for dinner.

All in all, home cooking is more than just putting food on the table, it’s time well spent with the family.  Studies have shown that families that do home cooking, eating together and talking over their day, have less stress and strive in their daily lives.